Monday, December 14, 2009

Ten Questions and Answers About Liberty-Link Soybeans in Georgia

Dr. Whitaker and Dr. Prostko have put together a guide to answer questions on Liberty Link Soybeans.
Please find the guide at this address:
Ten Questions and Answers About Liberty-Link Soybeans in Georgia

Thursday, December 10, 2009

Invasive Species and Right of Way Training

Time: 8AM til 9AM
Date: Thursday, December 17th, 2009
Location: Thomas County Public Works Meeting Room - 78 Joiner Road - Thomasville, GA 31757
Speaker: Dr. Dave Moorhead, UGA Warnell School of Forestry

Topics: Dr. Moorhead will discuss invasive species (non-native vegetation), concerns of these species, control recommendations, and identification.
Pesticide Credits: 1 Hour in Right of Way, Forestry have been applied for.

Please email R.J. Byrne for more information.

Thanks,
R.J. Byrne
www.thomascountyextension.com

Wednesday, December 9, 2009

Flavor of Georgia Food Product Contest 2010

Registration is now open for Flavor of Georgia Food Product Contest 2010!

The Flavor of Georgia food product contest is an annual celebration of all the flavors Georgia has to offer. Market-ready prototypes or commercially available food products are judged and critiqued by a panel of food experts.

Flavor of Georgia casts the spotlight on delicious, original food from right here at home. Unusual foods, (like a catfish burger), unique sauces, (try blueberry salsa), and traditional southern foods (anything peach or pecan) are ready for the competition. Barbecue and hot sauces, confections, dairy products, meat products, snack foods, and jams, jellies and sauces are judged based on flavor, Georgia theme, unique or innovative qualities, commercial appeal and originality.

Save $10 by registering online at http://www.flavorofgeorgia.caes.uga.edu/ beginning December 1, 2009. Deadline for entries is Friday, January 22, 2010, with finalists announced in February. Final judging will be held March 15 and 16, 2010 at the Freight Depot in Atlanta. Gov. Sonny Perdue will announce winners at the Governor’s Ag Day on March 16.

The Flavor of Georgia Food Product Contest is sponsored by the Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development along with partners Governor's Agricultural Advisory Commission, Georgia Agribusiness Council and UGA Department of Food Science and Technology.

Thursday, December 3, 2009

2010 Master Gardener Class Offered

Thomas County Extension will offer a Master Gardener Class beginning in March 2010. All classes will be held at the Thomas County Extension Office, 227 West Jefferson Street.

The Georgia Master Gardener Program is a volunteer recruitment and training program of the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension. The main purpose is to train volunteers to provide unbiased, research-based, environmentally sound, horticulture information to the public. Those completing the course will have a much greater knowledge of horticultural practices and will be expected to share their knowledge by volunteering 50 hours back into the community.

Most potential Master Gardeners want to know what community service entails. Community service is any activity in which your newly acquired horticultural knowledge is shared with others. These activities may include advising other citizens with caring for their landscapes, writing horticultural newsletters, working with youth, assisting with beautification projects, judging school projects dealing with agriculture, or civic and garden club presentations.

Most classes will be taught by extension agents and specialists from the University of Georgia. The following classes will be taught:

Introduction to the Master Gardener Program
Soil and Plant Nutrition
Botany/Plant Physiology
Basic Entomology/Pathology
Weed ID and Control
Using the Pest Control Handbook
Vegetable and Herb Gardening
Insects and Diseases of Vegetables
Herbaceous Ornamentals
Selecting Woody Ornamentals
Trees
Maintenance of Woody Ornamentals
Turf Selection and Maintenance
Diseases of Turf and Ornamentals
Developing a Waterwise Landscape
Insects of Turf and Ornamentals
Composting and Mulching
Fruit Gardening
Structural and Household Pests
Nuisance Wildlife

Registration fee for this class is $125.00 which includes a copy of the Georgia Master Gardener Handbook. A minimum enrollment of 10 participants is required to conduct this training. Maximum enrollment is 20 participants. More details on the course will be given during sign-up and be posted on our blog and website.

The deadline to apply is Thursday, February 25, 2009. Applications may be obtained at Thomas County Extension Office at 227 West Jefferson Street or by visiting our website www.thomascountyextension.com. You may download an application here. The class will run from late January to April 1st.


If you have any questions, please contact R.J. Byrne, Thomas County Extension Agent at 229.225.4130 or rjbyrne@uga.edu.

Wednesday, December 2, 2009

Pesticide Training Class

Thomas County Extension will have a pesticide training class coming up on December 9th, Wednesday, starting at 9 AM until 12 AM.

This training program is designed for: New private pesticide license applicants and as a continuing education credit for private and commercial license. This class is typically for
individuals in the agriculture sector, such as farming, landscaping, or forestry.

The program agenda will be:
8:30 Registration Check In
9:00 Pesticides
11:00 Break
11:15 Application Equipment
11:45 Test for new private pesticide license
12:00 End of program

Registration for the program is $10, and the deadline to register is Tuesday, December 8th. Space is limited, so please reserve your spot by contacting the office at 229.225.4130 or email us at uge4275@uga.edu with the subject - Pesticide Training. The office is located at 227 West Jefferson Street, across from the Thomasville library.

The University of Georgia Thomas County Extension service is an educational organization provided by the U.S. government, the state government through the University of Georgia and the Thomas County government. Anyone interested in more information can visit the website www.thomascountyextension.com, or contact Extension Agent R.J .Byrne at 229.225.4130 or rjbyrne@uga.edu.

Friday, October 23, 2009

Game Mngt Update Series # 7 - Food Plot and Vegetation Management

Announcing the 2009 FL-GA GAME MANAGEMENT UPDATE SERIES: FOOD PLOT AND VEGETATION MANAGEMENT at Aucilla Plantation - Thomas County, GA - brought to you by University of Georgia Thomas County Extension and University of Florida Leon County Extension.

A program for landowners, managers, outdoors men and women and others interested in game habitat management, hunting, and best natural resource management practices. ***** CFE Credit!!! *****

Download a flyer

Pre-registration required
No Registration on site
Bring your own camp chair
Cost: $25
Friday, November 6th

Topics:
1. Weed identification, management and importance
2. Basic soil science and soil management
3. Pesticides and herbicides
4. Food plot establishment with different soils and treatments
5. Managing native vegetation
6. Food Plot Herbicide trial
7. View 30+ different food plot mixes


Register On-line or Call
For information, including registration, contact either:

Dr. Bill Giuliano
UF/IFAS Dept. of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation
352-846-0575, docg@ufl.edu
http://www.wec.ufl.edu/wildlifeupdates/

Will Sheftall
Leon County Extension Agent
850-606-5200, sheftallw@leoncountyfl.gov
http://leon.ifas.ufl.edu

R.J. Byrne
Thomas County Extension Agent
229-225-4130, rjbyrne@uga.edu
www.thomascountyextension.com

Register on-line at sites listed above.
Pre-registration required. No registration on site.
Maps to event sites will be on website.
Registration is limited.

Wednesday, October 14, 2009

Name That Insect: Swallow Tail Larva

I have had several samples the past few days and they have all been the same insect. Well, larva actually, larva of the swallow tail butterfly.
The hosts of the giant swallow tail butterfly, Papilio cresphontes, include citrus, prickly ash, and hop trees. A common name of larva is the orange dog.

See the photos below to help you ID if your larva is the same.




Monday, October 12, 2009

Hunting Dog and Human First Aid Workshop Friday October 16th

A program for landowners, managers, outdoors men and women and others interested in game habitat management, hunting, and best natural resource management practices. Knowing what to do in an emergency may mean the difference between life or death. Come learn how to prevent emergencies, treat minor injuries, basics about first aid, what to do in the field before help arrives, and when to seek immediate assistance. This workshop is for anyone interested in learning more about basic first aid and designed to help guide you in making important decisions before help arrives.

Schedule
8:30 AM - Check in
9:00 AM - Presentations and Demonstrations
Noon - Lunch

Location:
REMINGTON EMS BUILDING
1202 Remington Ave, Thomasville, GA

Topics:
1. Human First Aid – safety in the field
2. Human First Aid – what to do about accidents, bandaging, preparation for Emergency personnel
3. Hunting Dog First Aid – basic first aid issues
4. Hunting Dog First Aid – what to do in the field, how to prevent accidents (perspective from the trainer/dog handler)

Cost: $25.00

Register On-line:
http://www.wec.ufl.edu/wildlifeupdates/

More info:
www.thomascountyextension.com

R.J. Byrne
229.225.4130

GA/FL Green Industry Update

Its time to register for the GA/FL Green Industry update.

The cost is $30.00 for early registration. Student cost is $15.00. The meeting here will be held at Val Tech. but there are other locations. Three hours of credit will be given in Category 21 and 24. There will be 6 CEU's for arborists and if you are an arborist you know how hard those are to come by. For more information on the program open the below link and click on the GA/FL program.

Georgia/Florida Green Industry Update Video Conference Scheduled for November 17, 2009
The Universities of Georgia and Florida will host a one-day video conference for Green Industry professionals on November 17, 2009. The purpose of the conference is to provide the latest information on new production and cultural practices, new plants, new pests, and new products for Green Industry Professionals. Participants can choose to attend the conference at one of five locations in Georgia: Savannah, Valdosta, Perry, Albany or Columbus.
The program offers a dynamic line-up of speakers on a wide-variety of current topics as well as pesticide re-certification credits and CEUs for participants from Georgia, Florida and South Carolina.
Space is limited, so early registration is encouraged. Participants can register three ways: by mail, by FAX or on-line. For detailed conference information and registration, see http://www.caes.uga.edu/external/tccc/calendar.html or phone (229) 386-3416.

Tuesday, October 6, 2009

SEN. CHAMBLISS' OFFICE AND USDA TO HOST LISTENING SESSION ON FSA PROGRAM DELIVERY SYSTEM

(TIFTON) The office of U.S. Sen. Saxby Chambliss (R-Ga.), Ranking

Republican Member of the Senate Agriculture Committee, and U.S. Department

of Agriculture Assistant Secretary for Administration Pearlie Reed will

host a listening session for area agriculture producers on Friday, October

9, 2009, at 9:30 a.m., at the University of Georgia Conference Center,

located at 15 RDC Road in Tifton. Hobby Stripling, Georgia State Director

for USDA's Farm Service Agency (FSA), will also be in attendance.



The listening session will offer area producers the opportunity to provide

comments and ask questions regarding FSA's program delivery system,

specifically its information technology (IT) system. The dated IT system

has contributed to challenges with program delivery, including software

development for farm bill programs and timely processing of program

benefits.



Area producers and members of the media are invited to attend the

listening session.



WHO: Office of U.S. Sen. Chambliss and USDA Assistant

Secretary for Administration Pearlie Reed

WHAT: Producer Listening Session

WHEN: Friday, Oct. 9, 2009, 9:30 a.m.

WHERE: University of Georgia Conference Center,

15 RDC Road, Tifton

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

White Tail Deer Management Program

2009 FL-GA
GAME MANAGEMENT UPDATE SERIES
WHITE TAIL DEER MANAGEMENT
Myrtlewood Plantation - Thomasville, GA

A program for landowners, managers,
outdoors men and women and others interested in game habitat management, hunting, and best natural resource management practices.


Pre-registration required
No Registration on site
Bring your own camp chair
Cost: $25
Friday, September 25th


Register On-line
For information, including registration, contact:
Dr. Bill Giuliano
UF/IFAS Dept. of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation
352-846-0575, docg@ufl.edu
http://www.wec.ufl.edu/wildlifeupdates/

Will Sheftall
Leon County Extension Agent
850-606-5200, sheftallw@leoncountyfl.gov
http://leon.ifas.ufl.edu

R.J. Byrne
Thomas County Extension Agent
229-225-4130, rjbyrne@uga.edu
www.thomascountyextension.com

Register on-line at sites listed above.
Pre-registration required. No registration on site.
Maps to event sites will be on website.
Registration is limited.


Schedule:
8:30 – Check-in, refreshments
9:00 – Field demo presentations
10:45 – Break
11:00 – Barn presentations
12:30 – Lunch
1:00 – Adjourn


Topics:
1. New food plot variety recommendations
2. Deer exclusion and deterrent practices
3. Protein, minerals, other feed and feeders
4. Warm-season forages
5. Cool-season forages
6. Perennial peanut options
7. FL deer management program

Friday, August 21, 2009

WALK GEORGIA

The fall session of Walk Georgia opens this Sunday, August 23. Registration will be open through September 8. Activity may be logged September 6 - October 31.

Grab your tennis shoes, tune up your bike, or pump up your basketball and join us as we explore our great state.

What is Walk Georgia?
Walk Georgia is an 8-week program to increase your physical activity in a fun, community-oriented way. You may participate as an individual and track your progress with other individuals in your county and state OR form a team of four to exercise together.
The online component of Walk Georgia provides an activity record to keep track of your weekly physical activity and time. The activity that you record is translated into "walked" miles, based on average rigor of the chosen activity and the time you were active.
When you accumulate miles, you will be able to navigate a map of Georgia and chart your course to "walk" Georgia. As you move throughout this virtual state, you will be able to view fun facts about each county you visit and learn new ways to improve your health. You will also be able to see how you compare to other individuals throughout the state.
We hope you will be inspired to join us and others in your county as we get more active and become healthier!

Participate as an individual or build your dream team and get registered at http://www.walkgeorgia.org.

For assistance with account registration visit: http://www.walkgeorgia.org/public/acctCreation_participant.html.

We recommend registering schools or large groups by September 3. Schools or groups may access the school registration kit at http://www.walkgeorgia.org/index.cfm?public=schoolKit.

To get started, go to the Walk Georgia website and create your account. For more information, contact your local University of Georgia Cooperative Extension office at 1-800-ASK-UGA1 or email walkga@uga.edu.
http://www.walkgeorgia.org
Move more and enjoy living more!
The Walk Georgia Task Force

Thursday, August 20, 2009

Hunters Education Skills Challenge (ALBANY,GA)


The Hunter Education Skills Challenge offers participants an opportunity to advance their outdoor education skills through competition. The program includes events that simulate realistic conditions in order to reinforce and test a young hunter's skills and it would be a great opportunity for 4-H members.

Who can participate?
Any youth (18 years of age and younger) who have completed a hunter education course. The competition includes two divisions: Junior (14 years of age and younger) and Senior (ages 15-18).

How can I get involved?
Youth first compete in a local challenge. Saturday, August 29, 2009 at Chickasawhatchee WMA in Albany 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.


How does it work?
Each challenge involves organized competition consisting of six components: archery, air rifle, safety trail challenge, orienteering, wildlife identification and a responsibility exam. Different components of the competition are worth different points for a maximum possible score of 500. The top 10 scoring participants at each local challenge event (in each division) are eligible to participate in the state challenge.

ArcheryComprised of 10 three-dimensional animal targets. Scoring is based on the Archery Shooters Association scoring system. Maximum score: 120

Air RiffleComprised of 10 shots at 10 yards. Shooters shoot two shots at each approved position in the Georgia Hunter Education Guide Book and two shots in their preferred position. Maximum score: 100

Wildlife IdentificationComprised of 20 items (hides, skulls, pictures, tracks, etc.) that participants have to identify. Maximum score: 100

Safety Trail ChallengeComprised of six locations at which a shooter must decide if they have a safe shot. There are six locations. Maximum score: 60

OrienteeringComprised of six flagged spots. Each participant must correctly take bearings and write down degrees of location. Maximum score: 60

ResponsibilityWritten test comprised of 30 questions that participants must answer. Maximum score: 60

The Hunter Education Skills Challenge offers youth an opportunity to advance their outdoor education skills through competition. This is an advanced hunter education program that takes youth who have received their hunter education to the next level by transferring the skills they learn in the classroom into the outdoors.

Volunteers are needed at event venues to help youth in the various competitive sections. Volunteers can help with all components, including archery, air-rifle, orienteering, shoot/don't shoot scenarios, wildlife identification and the responsibility exam. Most challenges are two to three hours. If you would like to help at one of the events, please contact Jennifer Pittman at 770.918.6416 or Jennifer.Pittman@dnr.state.ga.us.

Cotton & Peanut Research Field Day, September 9, Tifton, GA

Mark your calendars for the 2nd Annual UGA Cotton and Peanut Research Field Day scheduled for September 9, 2009.
The tour will begin at 8:30 a.m. and conclude with lunch; a detailed schedule of speakers and stops will be forthcoming. The field day is being sponsored by the Georgia Cotton Commission and the Georgia Peanut Commission.
Lunch will be included only for those who register by September 3.

To confirm your attendance, contact Debbie Rutland, Department of Entomology at (229)
386-3424.

Monday, August 10, 2009

Urban Tree Field Day

Thomas County Extension will conduct an urban tree field day at Cherokee Lake on Friday, August 14th, from 9AM to 11AM. We will meet at the boat ramp and picnic area.

The field day is open to all interested in learning more about our urban tree canopy. The program will consist of tree identification, what type of tree to plant in urban settings, economic and ecological benefits of trees, and also some information on the GPS/GIS tree mapping of Thomasville currently going on. We will have various experts on hand to lead the field day.

Come learn at this hands-on opportunity how to identify trees and how we benefit from trees. This is a great learning event for all. For more information contact R.J. Byrne at the Thomas County Extension Office 229.225.4130.

University of Georgia (SW DISTRICT) Recruitment Event



WHEN: Thursday, September 3, 2009

TIME: 5:30 pm

WHERE: UGA Tifton Campus Conference Center

WHO: 10th-12th grade students and college
transfer students interested in UGA
College of Agricultural and Environmental
Sciences - Parents Welcome

WHAT: Information on the college, admissions to
UGA, financial aid, and more!

10th-12th Graders:
To sign up, contact your local County
Extension Office (229)-225-4130, or email akcarter@uga.edu, or SW District office
(229)-386-3414 or email scromer@uga.edu.

Transfer Students:
Contact Erin Womack at (229) 386-3528 or
ewomack@uga.edu for more information.

Please register by August 28, 2009

Friday, July 31, 2009

Eric Hall Memorial Fund/ 4-H Schlorship




Amanda K. Carter

A $500 scholarship has been awarded to a Thomas County 4-H S.A.F.E. (Shooting, Awareness, Fun, and Education) member.

Gordon MacQuirter, received the Eric Hall Memorial Fund/4-H scholarship. MacQuiter, is a recent Thomas County Central High School graduate and a Thomas County 4-H S.A.F.E. member. He is the son of Danny and Kathy MacQuirter.

“4-H and shooting sports activities has helped me to be able to focus on other people’s achievements, and not just on my own. It has given me better sportsmanship so that I can cheer on my fellow shooters and one day I would like to either coach or instruct younger people shooting either in 4-H or in private lessons or hopefully in both. I would like to do that as my second job or after I retire” MacQuiter said.

MacQuirter is enrolled to attend Valdosta State University in the fall and has aspirations of becoming a dentist.

Thomas County 4-H would like to extend a sincere “Thank You” to The Eric Hall Memorial Fund. Without your dedication to the youth of Thomasville/Thomas County this scholarship would not have been possible.

For more information about 4-H, how to get involved, or to volunteer contact The University of Georgia/Thomas County Cooperative Extension office at 229-225-4130.

Eric Hall Memorial Shoot

The Eric Hall Memorial Foundation is sponsoring a Sporting Clays tournament on Saturday, October 3, 2009. Please see the attached donation registration form for more information. The Eric Hall Foundation supports The Thomas County S.A.F.E. Team. Last year they generously donated a $500.00 college scholarship to a Senior 4-H S.A.F.E. participate and purchased a new thrower for The Thomas County 4-H S.A.F.E. team.

In addition to the tournament The Eric Hall Memorial Foundation is holding a drawing/raffle on a chance to win a Beretta 391 (12 gauge) shotgun. Tickets are $5.00 each or 5 for $20.00. The Thomas County S.A.F.E. team is participating by assisting in selling tickets and $1.00 for every ticket sold will directly benefit The Thomas County S.A.F.E. team.

Will you please consider entering the tournament or purchasing one or more tickets? Due to the rising cost of ammo, insurance and targets it is imperative that The 4-H S.A.F.E. team have successful fund-raisers. The young people would greatly appreciate your support and you could possibly win a new gun!!

Tickets maybe purchased at The University of Georgia/Thomas County Extension Office which is located at 227 West Jefferson Street Thomasville, GA (Behind Ponder's Office Supply and beside the Public Library) or by contacting a 4-H S.A.F.E. member, or you may contact The Eric Hall Memorial Foundation.

Thanks in advance.


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Thomas County 4-H S.A.F.E. Team Blasts to 2nd State Championship!




The Thomas County 4-H S.A.F.E. (Shooting Awareness, Fun and Education) team members recently traveled to the beautiful Tom Lowe shooting range in Atlanta, Georgia to compete in the State 4-H Trap and Skeet competition.
4-H’ers statewide competed for individual and team awards at the annual event.

Five Thomas County junior division shooters and 49 other shooters from around the state displayed their shooting skills by competing on a total of 150 targets. By the end of any exciting day of competition, Thomas County Jr. S.A.F.E. team “smoked” the second place team from Fayette County by 35 targets and walked away with its second consecutive State Championship title. Members of the four man junior team included Brice Evans, Conner Gibbs, Jared Gibbs, and Trey Lanier.

Nine Thomas County senior division team members and 101 other senior division shooters competed on a total of 200 targets. Senior team members representing Thomas County included Brandon Barnes, Gordon MacQuirter, Nick Murphy, Ryan Setliff, Josh Smith, Brittany Vinson, Chelsea Vinson, Zach Walters, and Jon Wynn.

In the Senior division, Gordon MacQuirter (TCCHS) placed 7th in Trap and 4th in Skeet to give him a second place win overall in the State.

Junior shooter Trey Lanier (Brookwood) placed 1st in both Trap and Skeet which brought him to winning the coveted Overall State Title. Other junior awards included the following: Conner Gibbs (TCMS) – 3rd place Trap, 8th place Skeet, 3rd place Overall; Chandler Barnes (Brookwood) – 5th place Trap, 5th place Overall; Brice Evans (TCMS) – 4th place Skeet, 6th place Overall.

During the State competition awards ceremony, honors for the 4-H Trap and Skeet Postal League were also presented. Thomas County 4-Hers recognized were as follows: Brice Evans – Junior Trap & Junior Skeet; Jared Gibbs - Junior Skeet; and Gordon MacQuirter – Senior Skeet.

If anyone in grades 7-12 is interested in being a part of next year’s 4-H S.A.F.E. program, please contact Cindy Wynn or Amanda Carter at the Thomas County 4-H office (225-4130).

Thomas County 4H Shooters Aim High




Thomas County 4H Shooters Aim High
(WCTV6 Interview. "Click the above link to view")

One of the best 4H Shooting programs in the state resides in Thomas County, where year in and year out, the ultimate goal is within shooting distance.
"We're two time National Champions," Don Clark says, "We've won State several times. We've won high individuals, placed as individuals and as teams. Thomas County SAFE Program has had a lot of success. We're real proud of what our young people have done."

7th through 12th grade, boy and girl, it's a program that anyone can succeed at, if they put in the work. Jon Wynn says, "You've got to have concentration skills, you've got to be patient. You've got to handle pressure."

Chelsea Vinson adds, "You just have to come out here and practice. You can be just as good as the guys. It took a while for me to get up with them but once you get up with them it's fun."
And, according to Clark, safe as well.

Clark says, "We've never had an accident in Georgia in any of our county programs across the state. We teach these young people how to handle guns safely and we're teaching them a sport they can carry throughout their life."

That's a goal they all are shooting for.

Thursday, July 16, 2009

4-H'ers attend Camp Rock Eagle























Amanda K. Carter
akcarter@uga.edu

Twenty-six Thomas Co. Cloverleaf (4th-6th grade) 4-H'ers attended Rock Eagle 4- H Center for a memorable week of summer camp on June 29 through July 3, 2009. R.J. Byrne (Thomas County Ag Agent), Cindy M. Wynn (Thomas County 4-H Agent) and Amanda Carter (Thomas County 4-H CEPAIV) chaperoned the 4-H’ers.

The theme for the week of summer camp was Indian lore. Over 900 4-H'ers from counties all over the state were divided into three tribes Shawnee, Cherokee and Muskogee.

Thomas Co. 4-H'ers was a part of the Muscogee tribe. The Muskogee tribe is the land of the flaming arrows led by tribal mico’s and camp counselors. Campers had the opportunity to compete against other tribes in games, tribal meetings, cabin and area clean-up, class attendance, behavior, sportsmanship, cheers and a pageant throughout the week for an opportunity to win the tribal shield.

In addition, 4-Hers enjoyed many educational activities such as Herpetology, Natural History Exploration; Health’s Our Pledge, Wildlife, Forestry, Lake Ecology, and Entomology, just to name a few. Other activities included swimming, canoeing, sailing, archery, putt-putt, zip line, and a variety show put on by the camp counselors.

In keeping with tradition the story of the Rock Eagle Mound and how Rock Eagle got its legendary name was told at a pageant performed by campfire on Thursday night at the Pageant Grounds.

Thomas Co. 4-H'ers and adults enjoyed their exciting week at camp and they look forward to next year's summer camp adventure.

The Georgia 4-H summer camping program is ranked among the top in the nation. If you are interested in learning more about the 4-H camping programs or other 4-H opportunities and events please call The University of Georgia/Thomas County Extension Office at 229-225-4130.

Pulling for 4-H

2008-2009 4-H S.A.F.E. State Modified Trap Team!!

Jon W. 2nd place high individual state winner.

Senior 4-H S.A.F.E. 5th Place Modified Trap Team.Junior 2nd Place State Modified Winning Team (not pictured Dustin D.)



Amanda K. Carter
akcarter@uga.edu

Hold on: isn’t 4-H about kids raising cows and planting crops? Isn’t it about entering the county fair, attending camp, public speaking or sewing? You can shoot in 4-H? The 4-H program has something for everyone, including shooting sports. Shooting sports participants are expected to participate in at least 2 approved activities. These activities may include entering items into the Deep South Fair, attending leadership workshops, public speaking contest, and community service activities, etc. A main component of the 4-H shooting sports program is education. We want all participants to have a great time, get a little practice in and learn something. Ultimately the main emphasis is on helping young people grow into the best adults they can be, by developing qualities like responsibility, decision making, team work, citizenship and building youth adult partnerships.


The S.A.F.E. (Shooting, Awareness, Fun, & Education) Shooting Sports Program would not be possible without the countless hours certified coaches and volunteers devote to the program and the generous support of the community.


This year, 24 4-H’ers participated in Modified Trap and 15 participated in the Trap & Skeet Program. Modified Trap practices were held on Tuesdays and Trap and Skeet practice were held on Thursday’s beginning in February.


In order for 4-H S.A.F.E. participants to advance to state competition, they are required to successfully qualify at the District Competition held on Saturday, April 18th at The Thomas County 4-H range. Six counties from across GA participated in the Thomas County Qualifying Match. Twenty two Thomas county members earned the privilege to advance to the state modified competition, but all participants shot remarkably. Brittany Vinson, a Sr. 4-H’er, won the 1st place Sr. high individual award. 2nd place Sr. individual award presented to Coffee County’s Russ Roberson and 3rd place went to Ryan Setliff of Thomas County. 1st place Jr. Individual was presented to Coffee County’s Dillion Smith, 2nd place Jr. was Thomas Counties Brice Evans, and 3rd place honors went to Conner Gibbs of Thomas County.


On Saturday, May 9th 22 4-H’ers from Thomas County participated in the State Modified Trap Competition at Rock Eagle 4-H Center in Eatonton, GA. Sixty-six Senior Teams and 47 Junior Teams entered the event with over 860 youth participating. Thomas County Junior (7th and 8th Graders) A-Team came through with flying colors in the competition, sweeping in 2nd place in the state. The team members were Dustin Dolan (TCMS), Jared Gibbs (TCMS), Ian Carnahan (TCMS), Kipp Carter (TCMS), Brice Evans (TCMS), Conner Gibbs (TCMS), & Trey Lanier (TCMS).


Thomas County Junior B-Team also did an outstanding job. Team members consisted of Carter Reed (Brookwood), Chandler Barnes (Brookwood), Justin Myrick (TCMS), Michaela Smith (TCMS), and Jordan Hurst (TCMS).


The Thomas County Senior (9th-12th Graders) 4-H A-Team placed 5th in the State Competition. Team members included Brandon Barnes (TCCHS), Ryan Setliff (TCCHS), Jordon Odom (TCCHS), Gordon MacQuirter (TCCHS), and Chelsea Vinson (Brookwood).
Our senior 4-H B-Team members consisting of Brittany Vinson (Brookwood), Jon Wynn (TCCHS), Zach Walters (TCCHS), Nick Murphy (TCCHS), and Josh Smith (TCCHS) also shot exceptional.


Jon Wynn a 12th grader at TCCHS and Thomas County 4-H S.A.F.E. (Shooting, Awareness, Fun & Education) Club President finished with a bang! He shot 25 out of 25 targets and 10 doubles. His overall placing was 3rd individual in the State.


The Thomas County Trap & Skeet team is currently preparing for State Competition which is scheduled for May 30th at Tom Lowe in Atlanta, Ga.


In addition to the district and state competition 21 4-H’ers and adults participated in the Georgia 4-H Sporting clays competition held in Macon, GA at the Meadows Gun Club. Brice Evans was awarded 5th place junior honors.


Thomas County also hosted a fund-raiser Tournament at Quail Pointe Sporting Clays on May 2, 2009. Forty two 4-H’ers and adults entered the tournament and individual scores based on The Lewis Class System were awarded. Gordon MacQuirter won 1st place A-Team, 2nd place A-Team Trey Lanier, 3rd place A-Team Conner Gibbs, 4th place A-Team Mr. Tony Aycock from Lee County. B-Team 1st place went to Mr. Jack Zeigler, 2nd place B-Team Ryan Setliff, 3rd place B-Team winner Brice Evans, and B-Team 4th place honors Lyle Dollar. Mr. Doug Barton won C-Team 1st place, 2nd place C-Team Mr. JR. Reams, 3rd place C-Team Jeremy Brown, and 4th place C-Team award went to Kipp Carter.


4-H members were encouraged to enter the State 4-H Postal League Competition. Official scores were submitted from weekly practices and mailed to the state 4-H office. Accumulative winners were awarded to postal league winners preceding the State Modified Trap competition. Ryan Setliff, Trey Lanier, and Brice Evans received awards.


The success of our 4-H S.A.F.E. shooting sports program would not be possible without the dedication of certified coaches, parents, and volunteers. A special thanks to Mike and Rhonda Barnes, Derek and Kim Evans, Al and Dina Lanier, Michael Odom, Henry Wynn, Kirk Murphy, Danny MacQuirter, Mike Tonkin, Todd Gibbs, Dean Smith, Charlotte Boles, Mark Cain, and Tony and Sherri Odom.


Thomas County 4-H would also like to take this opportunity to thank the Thomas County Board of Commissioners, The Eric Hall Memorial Foundation, Officer Steve Jones and local donors. Without you all this program would not be possible.


A final congratulation goes out to all the 4-H S.A.F.E. members and their coaches for a successful 2009-2010 season. If you would like to learn more about our shooting sports program or 4-H, please give The University of Georgia/Thomas County Extension office a call at 225-4130 and ask for Amanda K. Carter or Cindy Wynn.

4-H'ers learn value of water





The Albany Herald
Thursday, June 4, 2008
Ethan Fowler
4-H'ers learn value of water ALBANY - Dougherty County 4-H member Keana Jones' thorough answer impressed Department of Natural Resources' Adam Kaeser.

Kaeser asked the assembled students at his presentation titled "Fish Ecology of the Flint River" what three things do fish need to survive in the river.

Jones responded: "Water, food and shelter."Jones and about 50 other 4-H members from Dougherty, Mitchell, Worth, Thomas, Baker and Decatur counties participated in the 4-H20 Camp at the Flint RiverQuarium Wednesday. The three-day camp concludes today in Dothan, Ala.

The camp covers everything about water, from conservation, the water cycle, careers involving water resources and the biology of watersheds. 4-H members, who range in age from 9-18, paid $25 to participate in the event.

This was the first year Southwest Georgia 4-H clubs came together for the camp. Mitchell County 4-H did the camp by itself last year.

Dougherty County Extension Agent Rad Yager is hoping that every Southwest Georgia county participates in the camp next year.

"Typically a (three-day) program like this costs $60 per child, but we're only charging $25 and a grant is supplementing the rest through Mr. (Charles) Stripling," said Melissa Martin, education manager at the RiverQuarium. "We're paying for lunch all three days, T-shirts and little mementos. I think it's kind of neat the kids took three days out of their summer to come to this camp and (I'm) really appreciative of the counties' 4-H leaders for providing transportation."

Georgia Youth Science and Technology Centers' Steve Rainey presented a program titled "Water Detectives." The 4-H members went down to the Flint River and sampled the water, as well as handled a crawfish that Rainey caught in a ditch to use as an example.

He said crawfish were the "mice of the river because everybody eats them."

"I've learned how the crawfish lives, how it grows back its body parts and how to sample the river's water," Worth County student member Mary Beth Amrowski said. "I appreciate that the adults come out and take time to tell us about the river.

"Eight-year Thomas County 4-H Program Assistant Amanda Carter participated in 4-H as child for four years."I hope that the kids learn about the importance of water quality and how important it is in our everyday lives," Carter said. "(4-H) is a learn by doing organization. Both of my kids are involved in 4-H and they enjoy every minute of it, whether it's shooting sports, public speaking contests, community service opportunities and 4-H camps."








Monday, July 13, 2009

Cogongrass: Invasive grass found in Thomasville and Thomas County

This is a notice to all to be on the look out for Cogongrass on your property. Cogongrass is a very invasive grass that spreads by rhizomes and forms dense, typically circular areas that excludes all other vegetation.
It is very difficult to remove and mowing and burning helps simulate growth of the cogongrass. If you believe you have this weed, please contact your County Extension Agent or your local Forestry Commission Office.



From http://www.invasive.org/ :


Cogongrass is a perennial, colony-forming grass which can grow up to 6 ft. (1.8 m) tall. Leaves have an off-center, whitish midrib and finely serrated margins. Leaves are up to 6 ft. (1.8 m) long, 0.5-0.75 in. (1.3-1.9 cm) wide, stiff, and have a sharp, pointed apex. Rhizomes are whitish, branched, scaly and sharp at the tips. Cogongrass is best identified in the spring by the large fuzzy panicle of flowers and seeds, giving the plant a cottony or silky look. Flower heads are 2-8 in. (5.1-20.3 cm) long, silvery-white and cylindrical. Cogongrass is an extremely aggressive invader with the capability of invading a range of sites. It forms dense, usually circular infestations that exclude all other vegetation. Cogongrass is native to Southeast Asia and was accidently introduced into the southeast United States in packing material in the early 1900s. It was also intentionally introduced for erosion control and livestock forage.

http://www.cogongrass.org/cogongrasspub.pdf

http://www.cogongrass.org/



Monday, July 6, 2009

Landscaper Lunch N Learn Update Series

· July 21 - Dr. Clint Waltz - Cultural Practices for Turfgrasses -Thomasville, GA
· July 28 - Dr. Patrick McCullough - Turf Weed and Herbicide Update -Valdosta, GA
· August 4 - Dr. Will Hudson - Insects of Turf and Ornamentals - Thomasville, GA
· August 11 - Dr. Alfredo Martinez - Diseases of Turf and Ornamentals- Valdosta, GA

Cost: $15 per session, Register by Monday Morning Prior to the Update.Open to all interested.
Time: Noon to 2pm
Includes: Lunch, pesticide credits have been applied for each meeting- Cat 24, 27, Private

Register at the Thomas County Extension Office - 229.225.4130 - or the Lowndes County Extension Office - 229.333.5185 by Monday Morning Prior to the Update.
Open to all interested.

Download flyer here.




Saturday, July 4, 2009

Thomas County Extension Prison Garden Project makes UGA's Homepage

UGA Thomas County Extension Agent R.J. Byrne makes the homepage of http://www.uga.edu/ with the news of the prison garden project at the Thomas County Prison.



The full story is online at http://www.uga.edu/. Thanks to the help of the Thomas County Master Gardeners this project has been a success. The story is archived under the UGA's Competing in a Global Economy - http://www.uga.edu/aboutUGA/compete-prison_garden.html

Wednesday, June 24, 2009

Are You Doing Everything Possible to Prevent Glyphosate And Other Herbicide Resistance In Your Weed Crop?

I thought this was a good read for everyone to be aware of. We all need to be concerned with the possibility of weeds becoming harder to control with herbicides. Good practices help overcome this.


Slowly they change. Ever so slowly. Year by year. Field by field. Weed by weed. Until suddenly your herbicide is nothing more than a warm summer mist that refreshes the weeds you wanted to kill. You’ve read magazine article about weeds becoming resistant to one or more herbicides, and now you have found it to be true on your farm. Short of sharpening Dad’s weed hook, what should be done?

Whether weed resistance is reality or a cold sweat nightmare for you, there is a variety of Best Management Practices (BMP) that can be adopted to delay the inevitable or totally avert the possibility of your farm being the talk of the neighborhood. Those BMP’s were identified by ag economists George Frisvold of the University of Arizona, Terrance Hurley of the University of Minnesota, and Paul Mitchell of the University of Wisconsin, who looked at corn, soybean, and cotton production practices that might provide a key to successful weed control. Their research involved a survey of 1,205 producers, who used a total of 10 different weed control practices.

Those practices were:
1. Scouting fields before herbicide applications
2. Scouting fields after herbicide applications
3. Start with a clean field, using either a burndown herbicide application or tillage
4. Controlling weeds early when they are relatively small
5. Controlling weed escapes and preventing weeds from setting seeds
6. Cleaning equipment before moving from field to field to minimize spread of weed seed
7. Using new commercial seed as free from weed seed as possible
8. Using multiple herbicides with different modes of action
9. Using tillage to supplement herbicide applications
10. Using the recommended application rate from the herbicide label

This list should be nothing new to most farmers, who have used most or all of the practices at various times. The critical issue is the fact that over 80% of corn and cotton acres and over 90% of soybean acres are planted to varieties that are resistant to glyphosate, and the evolution of weeds that are also resistant to glyphosate are threatening the sustainability of the transgenic technology. Farmers are urged to adopt a variety of practices to prevent resistance, but what is really happening?

To determine common practices, four hundred growers of each of the three commodities were surveyed, and questions were asked of those with more than 250 acres of the specific crop. The researchers found that 6 of the BMP’s were always practiced by at least 71% of farmers, but three were never practiced by a significant number of farmers. Those three were 1) cleaning equipment between fields, 2) rotating herbicide mode of action, and 3) using supplemental tillage. It should be noted that 49% of corn growers used multiple herbicides with different modes of action either often or always.

At least 90% of producers adopted five or more of the various practices. The economists also found that the number of BMP’s that were adopted:
• increased with a grower’s level of education
• increased for growers with expected yields greater than the county average yield
• was lower in counties with more variable yields
• was lower in crop reporting districts reporting more resistance problems.

The economists suggest, “These results suggest that yield risk is an important factor discouraging BMP adoption and that there may be some form of “good manager” effect at work, where growers with higher yields (or at least higher expected yields) than their neighbors tend to adopt more BMPs more frequently.”

Summary:
The growth in the number of weed species and population groups that are becoming resistant to one or more herbicides is a function of the weed control practices that are used by corn, soybean, and cotton farmers who plant 80% to 90% of their crops with varieties that are glyphosate resistant. However, among 10 clearly defined weed management practices, six of them have been thoroughly adopted by more than 70% of farmers, yet three of the practices have very minimal rates of adoption. Those with lower rates of adoption could be promoted by educators to increase the number of practices that are used to slow the growing weed resistance to various herbicides.
View article...

Cotton Pest Management Update

COTTON PEST MANAGEMENT NEWSLETTER #3

COTTON SITUATION: The Georgia Weekly Crop Progress and Condition Report for the
week ending June 14th listed the crop as 96 percent planted which is the same as the 5 year
average. Eleven percent of the cotton was squaring which is behind the 5 year average of 22
percent. Producers will be finishing up cotton planting in the coming days. This past week has
been HOT.

INSECT SITUATION: Thrips have posed only minor problems recently; seedlings are
developing quickly and thrips populations are generally low. Aphids have been reported in
several counties. We have observed spider mites in some field plots in Tifton.

View the complete newsletter from Dr. Phillip Roberts.

Friday, June 5, 2009

Prison Vegetable Garden Harvest

Update on the Thomas County prison garden - We have started harvesting some vegetables at the Prison Garden - Squash, Cucumbers, and Peppers. We are picking squash daily, and the trellised cucumbers keep loading up...














Thursday, June 4, 2009

Got the Stink?

Stink Bugs are among us, and they can do some damage if the population gets high enough.

In corn they can damage the ears. Begin scouting corn crops looking to find stink bugs.

From David Buntin, UGA Extension Entomologist:
http://www.caes.uga.edu/commodities/fieldcrops/gagrains/documents/Buntin_InsectControlinFieldCorn.pdf
"Ear Formation, Tasseling/Silking, and Kernel-fill Stages "
Stink bugs can cause feeding damage to small developing ears before silking. This type of feeding injury usually deforms ears into a C or boomerang shape. These ears fail to develop properly and are more susceptible to infection by corn smut fungus. Treat during the ear elongation / vegetative tassel stage (stage VT) if 1 stink bug per 2 plants is present. During pollination to blister stages (R1 – R3), stink bugs feed through the husk and damage individual kernels. Control is warranted if populations reach 1 bug per plant. Use pyrethroid insecticides if green stink bugs are prevalent. If brown stink bugs are prevalent, use methyl parathion before pollen shed (methyl parathion cannot be used during pollen shed). During pollen shed, high rates of bifenthrin or beta-cyfluthrin will provide about 75-90% control of brown stink bugs.


Tuesday, June 2, 2009

Cotton Scout School

Cotton Scout Schools: Cotton insect scouting schools are annually held at various locations in Georgia. These programs offer basic information on cotton insects and scouting procedures and will serve as a review for experienced scouts and producers and as an introduction to cotton insect monitoring for new scouts.

Contact for additional information:

Debbie Rutland - Tifton GA - June 8, 2009 - 9:00 am -12:30pm Tifton Campus Conference Center (229) 386-3424

Peyton Sapp - Midville GA - June 18, 2009 - 9:00 am -12:30pm Southeast Research and Education Center (706) 554-2119

Monday, May 11, 2009

Pesticide Training Class

Thomas County Extension will have a pesticide training class coming up on May 13th, Wednesday, starting at 9 AM until 12 AM.

This training program is designed for: New private pesticide license applicants and as a continuing education credit for private and commercial license. This class is typically for individuals in the agriculture sector, such as farming, landscaping, or forestry.

The program agenda will be:
8:30 Registration Check In
9:00 Pesticides
11:00 Break
11:15 Application Equipment
11:45 Test for new private pesticide license
12:00 End of program

Registration for the program is $10, and the deadline to register is Tuesday, May 12th. Space is limited, so please reserve your spot by contacting the office at 229.225.4130 or email us at uge4275@uga.edu with the subject - Pesticide Training. The office is located at 227 West Jefferson Street, across from the Thomasville library.

Monday, May 4, 2009

Thomas County Peanut Update + On Farm Variety Trial

Thomas County Peanut Update + On Farm Variety Trial
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5WqGtuZA1o4

Dr. John Beasley discusses a peanut variety trial with Thomas County Extension Agent R.J. Byrne on a Thomas County Plantation. 8 Varieties will be tested on farm.

Sunday, May 3, 2009

Thomas County Prison Vegetable Garden Project

Thomas County Extension Agent R.J. Byrne and Thomas County Prison Warden Robert Greer have started a vegetable garden at the Thomas County Prison.
Byrne and the Thomas County Master Gardeners will work with the Warden and the inmates to grow and harvest vegetables at the prison garden to reduce prison food costs and help teach inmates a new skill. Goals of this pilot project include helping to reduce food costs and expanding the size of the garden in future years.




Inmates grow their veggies in Thomasville

By Christian Jennings -

THOMASVILLE, GA (WALB) - Thomas county inmates have a new horticulture detail...their new vegetable garden on prison property off County Farm Road needs people to tend it.

That garden could end up saving tens of thousands of dollars in food costs.

It's not your typical garden. Here farmers are replaced with inmates and they're growing vegetables they'll eat at the prison dinner table.

"Today we're starting the planting," said RJ Byrne.

Thomas County extension agent RJ Byrne and Warden Robert Greer came up with the idea as a unique way to cope with rising food costs.

"On a weekly basis we spend about $5,000 for a week of food supply and of that probably $1000 or more in vegetables, in produce and we invested probably less than $1000 in this project," said Warden Greer.

Here's an example of how much the prison will save. One kernel of corn produces three ears of corn. And the warden only paid ten dollars for a four pound bag.

Now compare that with what you pay at the farmer's market. Here corn is two for a dollar.

"We're going to grow corn, squash, tomatoes, beans, peppers, okra, and cucumbers," said Byrne.

But the soon to be colorful, delicious vegetables will benefit more than just you, the taxpayer. They'll provide inmates with a new skill to take with them when they leave their cell.

"They're really interested in the garden and a lot of them are already volunteering to be on a permanent detail for this," said the Warden.

"It's going to save money and these guys are going to be able to watch these grow and eat the reward," said Byrne.

But until then, these inmates are just planting seeds of saving.

The inmate's garden is just a pilot project right now.

The warden and extension agents will show the garden and the cost savings to county commissioners soon and hope to expand the garden with their support.

Friday, May 1, 2009

Quail Management Field Update - May 8th

2009 GA-FL Game Management Update Series
Come learn about the latest research and information on game management and tour plantations in the Red Hills region to view management techniques.

***Please see brochure for more information including registration***

The first in the series is Quail Management - May 8th - Sunnyhill Plantation
Topics:

1. Developing a management plan for quail on your property
2. Aggressive rehab for timber, abused, and ignored lands in North FL/South GA
3. Fire and grassland birds
4. Benefits of quail management to non-target wildlife
5. Best native plants and vegetation for quail
6. National Bobwhite Conservation Initiative

Bring your camp chair.
Pre-register, no registration on site.

More information - 229.225.4130 - rjbyrne@uga.edu

Registration available on-line - http://www.wec.ufl.edu/wildlifeupdates/

Thursday, April 23, 2009

2009 GA-FL Game Management Update Series

Come learn about the latest research and information on game management and tour plantations in the Red Hills region to view management techniques.


First : Quail - May 8th - Sunnyhill Plantation
Second : Dove and Ducks - August 21st - Pinckney Hill Plantation -
Third : Fish Ponds - September 11th - Camp Piney Woods -
Fourth : Deer - September 25th - Myrtlewood Plantation -
Fifth : Turkey - October 9th - Osceola Plantation -
Sixth : Hunting Dog and Human First Aid - October 16th - Remington EMS -
Seventh : Food Plots, Soils, Weeds, and Herbicides - November 6th - Aucilla Plantation -

More information - 229.225.4130 - rjbyrne@uga.edu

Registration available on-line - http://www.wec.ufl.edu/wildlifeupdates/


Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Lunch and Learn: Forest Weed And Herbicide Update

Thomas County Extension will be conducting a Forest Weed and Herbicide Update.

The update meeting will be on Tuesday, April, 21 starting at Noon at the Thomas County Extension Office. Dr. Dave Moorhead with UGA’s Warnell School of Forestry will present an update on weed control and forestry herbicides.

This program is open to all interested. The cost is $10 which includes lunch and materials. Private and commercial pesticide credits will be given. Visit our website for more information – www.THOMASCOUNTYEXENTION.com

Space is limited, so please pay by Monday, April 20th. Register by contacting the office at 229.225.4130 or email us at uge4275@uga.edu with the subject – Forestry Weed Meeting. The office is located at 227 West Jefferson Street, across from the Thomas County Public library.

Tuesday, April 14, 2009

CALLING ALL PET LOVERS......





CALLING ALL PET LOVERS . . .
THOMAS COUNTY 4-H IS HOLDING A PET FOOD DRIVE FOR THE THOMASVILLE/THOMAS COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY

Bring your donations to the Thomas County 4-H Horse Show on Saturday, April 18 at the Pike Creek Ranch Arena (located on Hwy. 122 east of Pavo at the Sandhill caution light) or to the Thomas County 4-H S.A.F.E. Qualifying Match at the 4-H Shooting Range on County Farm Road. Both events will begin at 9:00 a.m. and there is no admission fee.

Donations can also be dropped off at the 4-H office located on west Jefferson Street!

Our humane society is in desperate need of pet food. They typically feed dry Pedigree but they are accepting any brand of dog food.
They also are in need of the following items:
Dry puppy and dry kitten food
Canned puppy and kitten food
KMR Kitten Milk
ESBILAC Puppy Milk
Blankets, towels and Clorox Wipes
Heating pads w/auto turn off
Q-Tips, cotton balls & alcohol
Office supplies (Copier paper, stamps, tape etc.)

For more information contact:
Cindy Wynn or Amanda Carter
Thomas County 4-H
(229) 225-4130










Friday, April 10, 2009

Tree Workshop - Friday, April 17th

Thomas County Extension will be conducting an Urban Tree Workshop.

Come learn and participate in the Urban Tree Workshop at the Remington EMS on Friday, April, 17th starting at 8:30 AM. We will discuss tree pruning, health, identification, and selection. Hands-on exercises include proper pruning techniques and tree identification. Participants will also receive tree books and related materials. This class is meant to teach you how to prune properly, identify tree health issues, how to identify common trees in our region, and tree selection. Bring your pruners to practice your pruning!

This program is open to all interested. The cost is $25 which includes lunch, books, and materials. Category 24 and Private Pesticide credits will be given. Visit our website for more information – http://www.thomascountyexention.com/

Space is limited, so please pay by Wednesday, April 15th. Register by contacting the office at 229.225.4130 or email us at uge4275@uga.edu with the subject – Urban Tree Workshop. The office is located at 227 West Jefferson Street, across from the Thomas County Public library. For more information please contact R.J. Byrne.

Wednesday, April 1, 2009

RESCHEDULED: Hunting Dog and Human First Aid

The Hunting Dog and Human First Aid Workshop has been Rescheduled due to weather.

The new time will be annouced shortly.

UGA Thomas County Extension and UF Leon County Extension office present the first part of the hunting workshop series: Hunting Dog and Human First Aid Workshop.

4-H S.A.F.E. Youth and Adult Quail Pointe Tournament


The Thomas County 4-H S.A.F.E. (Shooting, Awareness, Fun and Education) programs goal is to enhance youth development of self-concept, character and personal growth through safe, educational and socially acceptable involvement in shooting sports activities.

Please consider investing in our future—the youth of Thomas County by participating or donating to the Quail Pointe Fund-raiser tournament scheduled for Saturday, May 2, 2009.

1 Round of Trap, 1 Round of Skeet, 1 Round of 5-Stand . Scoring is based on The Lewis Class System Individual scores.

Registration Fee: $35.00 for 4-H members. $40.00 pre-registered adults and non-4-H members. $50.00 adult, youth and non-4-H members day of tournament.

Call (229)-224-4130 for more information.

With your support we can “MAKE THE BEST BETTER”!

Thursday, March 26, 2009

Hunting Dog and Human First Aid Workshop

UGA Thomas County Extension and UF Leon County Extension office present the first part of the hunting workshop series: Hunting Dog and Human First Aid Workshop.







Knowing what to do in an emergency may mean the difference between life or death. Come learn how to prevent emergencies, treat minor injuries, basics about first aid, what to do in the field before help arrives, and when to seek immediate assistance. This workshop is for anyone interested in learning more about basic first aid and designed to help guide you in making important decisions before help arrives.
Speakers: Local Veterinarian, EMS Personnel, and a Dog Trainer.

When: FRIDAY, April 3rd, Starting at Noon with Lunch

Where: Remington EMS - 1202 Remington Avenue, Thomasville, GA 31792
***PARK IN BACK***

Cost: $20, includes lunch. Register by Wednesday, April 1st, by contacting Thomas County Extension Office @ 229.225.4130. For more information, contact R.J. Byrne, Thomas County Extension Agent.

Wednesday, March 18, 2009

Update on Farm Bill Meetings

Looking for the latest info on the Farm Bill?

Then you need to attend one of the information sessions below. For more information please contact R.J. at the extension office - 229.225.4130 or rjbyrne@uga.edu. You will need to register for the location you will be attending.

DATES AND LOCATIONS
-March 23, Camilla (Mitchell Co. Extension Office), 5-9pm
-March 24, Midville (Station), 12-4pm
-March 26, Hawkinsville (Steakhouse Resturant), 10am-2pm
-March 27, Alma (Bacon Co. Extension Office), 10am-2pm

PROPOSED AGENDA
* Crops Outlook- Nathan Smith and Don Shurley (45 min)
* Budgets and Crop Comparisons- Amanda Smith (15 min)
* Farm Bill Overview- Don Shurley (10 min)
* DCP and Loan- Nathan Smith (15 min)
* Conservation Programs- Amanda Smith (20 min)
* Attribution, Limits, Eligibility- Keith Kightlinger (20 min)
* SURE- Wes Harris (20 min)
* ACRE- Don Shurley and Wes Harris (15 min)
* FSA Open Q and A (20 min)

Friday, March 13, 2009

New season of 'Gardening in Georgia' coming to GPB

For winning gardening advice, tune into the new season of “Gardening in Georgia with Walter Reeves,” starting Saturday, April 4. The show’s 10th season will air on Georgia Public Broadcasting stations across the state each Saturday at 12:30 p.m., repeating Saturdays at 6:30 p.m. and again on Wednesdays at 7 p.m. through the end of October.

Story Number: 3678To review this article and/or download a version of it, click on the link below:http://georgiafaces.caes.uga.edu/storypage.cfm?storyid=3678

Wednesday, March 11, 2009

Lunch and Learn Series - Bio-Fuels: Is This Really The Alternative?


· What renewable fuels are really going to work?
· Can I make my own bio-fuel?
· What are the benefits of corn based ethanol?
· Are bio-fuels competing for food crops?
· How much is the Federal Government spending on bio-fuels?
· What advances have been made regarding forestry bio-mass?
· How economically important are bio-fuels?

Come eat lunch and learn about bio-fuels at the UGA Thomas County Extension office. We will have USDA and UGA Engineering, Agronomy, and Warnell School of Forestry experts at this program.

This program is open to all interested. Register by paying at the Thomas County Extension Office.

For a flyer visit here.

Where: UGA Thomas County Extension Office
227 West Jefferson Street
Thomasville, GA 31792

When: 12:15 PM - Thursday, March 26th

Cost: $10 - Due by Tuesday, March 24th
***Includes Lunch***

Who To Contact: R.J. Byrne - 229.225.4130 - rjbyrne@uga.edu



Wednesday, March 4, 2009

2009 edition of annual UGA Spring Garden Packet

Welcome to the 34th annual Spring Garden Packet. Put out each year by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, this edition has 25 feature articles written by 14 CAES faculty members, news editors and graduate and undergraduate students to provide timely, valuable gardening information.

The Gardening information can be found here.

Monday, March 2, 2009

Pecan Scout School

Just a reminder about the Pecan Scout School to be held at the RDC in Tifton on Wed. March 4, 2009.

Pecan Spray Guides will be available.
Program can be seen below:
8:00-8:30 Registration (Coffee & Donuts)
8:30-9:30 Recognizing and Correcting Pecan Nutritional and Cultural Problems---Dr. Lenny Wells, UGA Horticulture
9:30-10:30 Pecan Diseases---Jason Brock, UGA Plant Pathology
10:30-11:00Break (Refreshments Provided)
11:00-12:00Pecan Insects—Dr. Will Hudson, UGA Entomology
Commercial and Private Pesticide Credits Available

Thursday, February 26, 2009

Scouting for Hessian Fly in Georgia

Now is the time in central and southern Georgia to check susceptible wheat for Hessian fly infestation. Hessian fly is most in the pupal (flax seed stage) and will be emerging and laying eggs over the next few weeks.

It may be feasible to control or at least suppress re-infestation of Hessian fly in susceptible fields by a well-timed insecticide treatment of Karate
Z. This requires scouting and assessing the level of infestation.

This new guide provides photos and information for sampling and making a treatment decision.

Scouting for Hessian Fly in Georgia and Alabama

UGA Wheat Production Page

-David Buntin, Grain Crop Entomologist

Wednesday, February 25, 2009

What's A Fair Pasture Rental Rate?

How do you figure a fair rental price for pasture land?

You can use these publications from the Ohio Extension and North Dakota Extension offices to help you determine what a fair price to rent pasture land.

Ohio State Extension Publication:
http://ohioline.osu.edu/fr-fact/0008.html

North Dakota Extension Publication:
http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/pubs/plantsci/hay/r1092w.htm

Thursday, February 19, 2009

Storm information available + Health Department waving well water tests

For those of you in counties effected by last night’s storms, remember there is information available for you on the Natural Disasters In Georgia Web site at http://www.caes.uga.edu/topics/disasters/

The Thomas County Health Department is waving well water tests (bacteria) for those that have had damage to wells from this mornings storm. Please contact the Thomas County Health Department 229.226.4241

Friday, February 13, 2009

Walk Georgia Registration opens this Sunday

The spring session of Walk Georgia will open for registration this Sunday, February 15. Registration will be open through March 9. Activity may be logged March 1 – April 25, so dust off your walking shoes (or tune up your bike, or pump up your basketball) and join us as we explore our great state.

Participate as an individual or build your dream team and get registered at www.walkgeorgia.org. For those of you that completed last year’s survey, thank you for your thoughts and suggestions. We have incorporated many of your ideas and look forward to hearing from you at the close of the spring 2009 session.

For more information, contact your local University of Georgia Cooperative Extension office at 1-800-ASK-UGA1 or email walkga@uga.edu.

To get started, go to the Walk Georgia website starting Sunday and create your account.
www.walkgeorgia.org

Move more and enjoy living more!

The Walk Georgia Task Force

Thursday, February 12, 2009

Thomas County Extension Conducting Pesticide Training Class

Thomas County Extension will have a pesticide training class coming up on March 3rd, Tuesday, starting at 9 AM until 12 AM.


This training program is designed for: New private pesticide license applicants and as a continuing education credit for private and commercial license. This class is typically for individuals in the agriculture sector, such as farming, landscaping, or forestry.


The program agenda will be:
8:30 Registration Check In
9:00 Pesticides
11:00 Break
11:15 Application Equipment
11:45 Test for new private pesticide license
12:00 End of program

Registration for the program is $5, and the deadline to registration is Friday, February 27th. Space is limited, so please reserve your spot by contacting the office at 229.225.4130 or email us at uge4275@uga.edu with the subject - Pesticide Training. The office is located at 227 West Jefferson Street, across from the library.


The University of Georgia Thomas County Extension service is an educational organization provided by the U.S. government, the state government through the University of Georgia and the Thomas County government. Anyone interested in more information can visit the website www.thomascountyextension.com.

Wednesday, February 11, 2009

Growing Bigleaf Hydrangea

Bigleaf hydrangea, Hydrangea macrophylla, also called French, Japanese or Snowball hydrangea, is both a florist plant and landscape plant in Georgia. Often purchased as a gift plant from florists, bigleaf hydrangea can be transplanted to the landscape for repeat blooms each year. Homeowners delight in changing the flower color from pink to blue or from blue to pink by adjusting the pH of their soil.

Check here for the Hydrangea publication.

Thinking of planting some Flowering Perennials?

With spring around the corner, you might be thinking of planting the flower bed soon.

Check out University of Georgia Horticulture specialist Dr. Paul Thomas's publication -
Flowering Perennials for Georgia Gardens

Here is a sample of the publication:
"Plants are classed according to their growth cycle as annuals, biennials or perennials. Annuals are short-lived plants that complete their entire life cycle within one growing season. Biennials normally do not bloom until the second season, form seeds and then die. Perennials live from year to year, with varying bloom times.

Perennials are also classed as woody (trees and shrubs that produce woody above-ground stems and branches that live from year to year) or herbaceous (plants that produce comparatively soft tissues which often die back to ground level at the end of the growing season). Herbaceous perennials persist by means of various underground storage structures—bulbs, corms, tubers, tuberous stems, tuberous roots and crowns.

The distinction between annuals and perennials, woody and herbaceous, is not always sharply defined because climate influences growth potential. Further, those biennials and perennials that bloom the first year along with tender perennials (those actually killed by frost) are often treated as annuals in the landscape.

This publication is devoted specifically to herbaceous perennials (subsequently referred to simply as perennials), primarily to those that persist from crowns and/or fleshy roots. For information on bulbous-type herbaceous perennials (daffodil, canna, dahlia, etc.), refer to Extension bulletin 918, Flowering Bulbs for Georgia Gardens. "

Monday, February 2, 2009

Deciduous Tree ID in Winter

The University of Florida/IFAS – Leon Co Extension is offering a Tree ID Lab in Tallahassee, FL.

If you would like more info about the program you can call Genice Harris at 850-606-5202 or harrisg@leoncountyfl.gov by Mon 2 Feb, or you can also call the UGA Thomas County Extension Office, R.J. Byrne, at 229.225.4130 or uge4275@uga.edu

Due to the popularity of our annual late summer/early fall Tree ID Lab with foliated specimens, we’re offering for the 3rd year a similar program on identifying deciduous trees in winter, using twigs, buds, bark & form. The program will entail an indoor lab and field hike. Our goal is to teach you how to identify about 50 of N FL’s most prevalent deciduous species. We will use fresh specimens in our indoor lab. Bring a hand lens or magnifying glass.

Wednesday 4 February
9:00 – 12:00 am
Leon Extension AuditoriumTwig & Bud Indoor Lab

Monday 9 February
1:00 – 4:00 pm
Elinor-Klapp Phipps ParkBark & Form Field Hike

Free for UF Extension volunteers (Master Wildlife Conservationists and Master Gardeners)

$20 total for professionals (materials, CEUs, Certificate of Completion for attending all 6 hours of training)

$10 total for citizens (materials and Certificate of Completion for attending all 6 hours of training)

Contact Genice Harris at 850-606-5202 or harrisg@leoncountyfl.gov by Mon 2 Feb to register for either or both events, and for CEUs